Here is a video breaking down a rig for Puppet Animation.  Personally I’m okay with it if it is creative and good.  I guess because I come from the old flash days when you had to do things differently because there was no streaming at the time.  Tween animation helped keep file sizes down.    Because of this I’m okay with this type of animation if done correctly.

Here is a tutorial breaking down a rig.

Here are examples of good old fashioned tweening.  Funny thing is this has become really popular over the years even in mainstream work.

I’m working on 3 Anime/Manga series.  Basically animated comic books online.  I’m going to document all my steps.  One of the biggest things for me is to give it some style and a different look across the board.  I’ve finally decided on the 3 styles for my 3 very different series.

Wink! Multiverse Adventures will be my first order of business.

Coverss copy (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is a combination of styles but the main style will be done similar to JOJOs OP style done by Kamikaze Douga Animation.

I think your style is very important to creating something awesome but style can also mask some deficiencies in your own work, make it yours and work within your limitations as an artist yet still set you apart.

Here is more stuff from them.

Michel Victor has some cool work.

He has extensive tutorials on how to add animation to a still drawing.  You don’t have to make the whole anime frame by frame.  Why not do a manga with a little bit of pizzaz to it.

 

You can get your tutorials here…

 

https://gumroad.com/michelvictor

 

I was looking for videos about how to make anime and came across this.

 

Here is the making of video

Now I know what you are thinking.   What can I learn from this?  Actually you can learn 3 important things.

1. You want to make money out of your anime you have to reach an audience.   Or if you simply want as many people to enjoy it you must find an audience.   Notice how may hits this guy has. It is in Spanish.  There are tons of fans in the world who love, love, love anime.  Why not create something specific for some group especially if you are part of said group.  Like this guy.

2. Get out and film live action shots and learn how to piece things together without having first sit down and animate.  It will greatly increase your skills and who says your story has to be animated?

3. If you want it animated then try this…..film it in real life, then animate on top of it.

 

IF you wanted to make an animated series that looks good but without all the render time then look no further than real time.

If you have checked out UE4 you know what I’m talking about.

If you are going to make your own anime, you have to be able to animate.   One of the tools of choice is non-other than Flash, now called Adobe Animate or something of that nature.  I wanted to post this step by step guide for some of your newer guys just trying to collect information on how to animate.

Flash is where I started and I still have it on my hard drive today.  It is easy to use and was just what I originally started using as well as many Animators out there.

Adobe Animate is now available for around $20 bucks a month.  But if you cannot afford it there are tons of cool, free animation tools.

Here is the same creator above using FREE Tools.

 

The tutorials above are by Jesse Jones.  I ran into his work when several artists were animating an entire episode of Dragoball.  It was a fun project.

Follow the link below to check it out.

 

I really like this method used by these comic book creators.  Poser may seem like a cheat but I’m really wanting to tell stories.   Noticed in this webinar that Brian said he can do about 6 pages per day.   This gives you speed and quality that you would not normally be able to get out of hand drawn work.

You can apply the same principals in this video for Anime or Manga.    I hope you enjoy this awesome Webinar.